Witch-Hunting in Seventeenth-Century New England: A Documentary History 1638-1693, Second Edition: A Documentary History 1638-1693

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Duke University Press Books #ad - Hall addresses a wide range of important issues: witchcraft lore, antagonistic social relationships, religious ideologies, popular and learned understandings of witchcraft and the devil, the vulnerability of women, and the role of the legal system. The cases examined begin in 1638, and document for the first time the extensive Stamford-Fairfield, Connecticut, extend to the Salem outbreak in 1692, witch-hunt of 1692–1693.

The documents capture deep-rooted attitudes and expectations and reveal the tensions, anger, envy, and misfortune that underlay communal life and family relationships within New England’s small towns and villages. Primary sources include court depositions as well as excerpts from the diaries and letters of contemporaries.

Each section is preceded by headnotes that describe the case and its background and refer the reader to important secondary interpretations. The original texts tell in vivid detail a multi-dimensional story that conveys not only the process of witch-hunting but also the complexity of culture and society in early America.

Witch-Hunting in Seventeenth-Century New England: A Documentary History 1638-1693, Second Edition
: A Documentary History 1638-1693
#ad - They cover trials for witchcraft, reports of diabolical possessions, suits of defamation, and reports of preternatural events. This superb documentary collection illuminates the history of witchcraft and witch-hunting in seventeenth-century New England. This volume is an extraordinarily significant resource for the study of gender, religion, village politics, and popular culture in seventeenth-century New England.

Here one encounters witch-hunts through the eyes of those who participated in them: the accusers, the victims, the judges. In his incisive introduction, David D.

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Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England

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Oxford University Press #ad - By investigating the surviving historical documents of over a hundred actual witchcraft cases, he vividly recreated the world of New England during the witchcraft trials and brought to light fascinating information on the role of witchcraft in early American culture. Now demos has revisited his original work and updated it to illustrate why these early Americans' strange views on witchcraft still matter to us today.

He provides a new preface that puts forth a broader overview of witchcraft and looks at its place around the world--from ancient times right up to the present. In the first edition of the bancroft Prize-winning Entertaining Satan, John Putnam Demos presented an entirely new perspective on American witchcraft.

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The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - This is not just another book about witchcraft. Edmund S. The case of ann cole, who was "taken with very strange Fits, " fueled an outbreak of witchcraft accusations in Hartford a generation before the notorious events at Salem. More than three hundred years later, the question "Why?" still haunts us. A wealthy boston widow, Ann Hibbens was hanged in 1656 for casting spells on her neighbors.

Morgan, " mary johnson, yale universityConfessing to "familiarity with the devils, a servant, was executed by Connecticut officials in 1648. Why were these and other women likely witches—vulnerable to accusations of witchcraft and possession? Carol F. Karlsen reveals the social construction of witchcraft in seventeenth-century New England and illuminates the larger contours of gender relations in that society.

The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England #ad - A pioneer work in…the sexual structuring of society.

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Salem Possessed: Social Origins of Witchcraft

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Harvard University Press #ad - Tormented girls writhing in agony, stern judges meting out harsh verdicts, nineteen bodies swinging on Gallows Hill. It is a story of powerful and deeply divided families and of a community determined to establish an independent identity—beset by restraints and opposition from without and factional conflicts from within—and a minister whose obsessions helped to bring this volatile mix to the flash point.

. Not simply a dramatic and isolated event, the pressures of land and population in New England towns, the problems besetting farmer and householder, the shifting role of the church, the Salem outbreak has wider implications for our understanding of developments central to the American experience: the disintegration of Puritanism, and the powerful impact of commercial capitalism.

Salem Possessed: Social Origins of Witchcraft #ad - The stark immediacy of what happened in 1692 has obscured the complex web of human passion which climaxed in the Salem witch trialsFrom rich and varied sources—many neglected and unknown—Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum give us a picture of the people and events more intricate and more fascinating than any other in the massive literature.

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In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692

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Vintage #ad - In 1692 the people of Massachusetts were living in fear, and not solely of satanic afflictions. Horrifyingly violent indian attacks had all but emptied the northern frontier of settlers, and many traumatized refugees—including the main accusers of witches—had fled to communities like Salem. Meanwhile the colony’s leaders, defensive about their own failure to protect the frontier, pondered how God’s people could be suffering at the hands of savages.

Award-winning historian mary Beth Norton reexamines the Salem witch trials in this startlingly original, meticulously researched, and utterly riveting study. Struck by the similarities between what the refugees had witnessed and what the witchcraft “victims” described, many were quick to see a vast conspiracy of the Devil in league with the French and the Indians threatening New England on all sides.

In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 #ad - By providing this essential context to the famous events, and by casting her net well beyond the borders of Salem itself, Norton sheds new light on one of the most perplexing and fascinating periods in our history.

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The Salem Witch Hunt Bedford Series in History and Culture

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Bedford/St. Martin's #ad - In his revised introduction, richard godbeer offers coverage of the convulsive ergotism thesis advanced in the 1970s and a discussion of new scholarship on men who were accused of witchcraft for explicitly gendered reasons. The book’s final documents cover recantations of confessions, the aftermath of the witch hunt, and statements of regret.

A chronology of the witchcraft crisis, questions for consideration, and a selected bibliography round out the book's pedagogical support. The salem witch trials stand as one of the infamous moments in colonial American history. This second edition continues to explore the beliefs, fears, and historical context that fueled the witch panic of 1692.

The Salem Witch Hunt Bedford Series in History and Culture #ad - New to this edition are records from the trial of Samuel Wardwell, a fortune-teller or "cunning man" whose apparent expertise made him vulnerable to suspicions of witchcraft. More than 150 people -- primarily women -- from 24 communities were charged with witchcraft; 19 were hanged and others died in prison.

Presented as case studies, the carefully chosen records from several specific trials offer a clear picture of the gender norms and social tensions that underlie the witchcraft accusations. The documents in this volume illuminate how the Puritans' worldview led them to seek a supernatural explanation for the problems vexing their community.

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Escaping Salem: The Other Witch Hunt of 1692 New Narratives in American History

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Oxford University Press #ad - The stakes were high--if found guilty, the two accused women would be hanged. In the afterword, godbeer explains how he used the trial evidence to build his narrative, offering an inside perspective on the historian's craft. It can also be used for courses in colonial American history, culture, and religion; witchcraft in the early modern world; and crime and society in early America.

Escaping salem reconstructs the "other witch hunt" of 1692 that took place in Stamford, Connecticut. Were the pain and screaming due to natural or supernatural causes? Was Branch simply faking the symptoms? And if she was indeed bewitched, since her information came from demons who might well be lying? For the judges, why believe her specific accusations, Godbeer shows, the trial was a legal thicket.

Escaping Salem: The Other Witch Hunt of 1692 New Narratives in American History #ad - Featuring maps, and a selected bibliography, photos, Escaping Salem is ideal for use in undergraduate U. S. Survey courses. In an intriguing chapter, godbeer examines Magistrate Jonathan Selleck's notes on how to determine the guilt of someone accused of witchcraft, providing an illuminating look at what constituted proof of witchcraft at the time.

The court in salem had become mired in controversy over its use of dubious evidence. The salem witch hunt of 1692 is among the most infamous events in early American history; however, it was not the only such episode to occur in New England that year. Escaping salem takes us inside the Connecticut courtroom and into the minds of the surprisingly skeptical Stamford townspeople.

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The Witchcraft Sourcebook: Second Edition

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Routledge #ad - Catholics and protestants alike feared that the Devil and his human confederates were destroying Christian society. Including trial records, narratives of demonic possession, and artistic depiction of witches, demonological treatises and sermons, literary texts, the documents reveal how contemporaries from various periods have perceived alleged witches and their activities.

This second edition includes an extended section on the witch trials in England, Scotland and New England, fully revised and updated introductions to the sources to include the latest scholarship and a short bibliography at the end of each introduction to guide students in their further reading. The sourcebook provides students of the history of witchcraft with a broad range of sources, many of which have been translated into English for the first time, with commentary and background by one of the leading scholars in the field.

The Witchcraft Sourcebook: Second Edition #ad - During these years the prominent stereotype of the witch as an evil magician and servant of Satan emerged. Many of the sources come from the period between 1400 and 1750, when more than 100, 000 people - most of them women - were prosecuted for witchcraft in Europe and colonial America. Brian P. The witchcraft sourcebook, now in its second edition, is a fascinating collection of documents that illustrates the development of ideas about witchcraft from ancient times to the eighteenth century.

Levack shows how notions of witchcraft have changed over time and considers the connection between gender and witchcraft and the nature of the witch's perceived power.

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A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience Pivotal Moments in American History

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Oxford University Press #ad - Engaging a range of perspectives, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them--and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, he looks at the key players in the outbreak--the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, and why it has become an enduring legacy.

Salem in 1692 was a critical moment for the fading Puritan government of Massachusetts Bay, whose attempts to suppress the story of the trials and erase them from memory only fueled the popular imagination. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work.

A brilliantly told tale, a storm of witchcraft also puts Salem's storm into its broader context as a part of the ongoing narrative of American history and the history of the Atlantic World. Beginning in january 1692, salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America.

A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience Pivotal Moments in American History #ad - Baker argues that the trials marked a turning point in colonial history from Puritan communalism to Yankee independence, from faith in collective conscience to skepticism toward moral governance. The resulting salem witch trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history.

Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria--but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, salem was "a perfect storm": a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, and which has haunted us ever since.

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Before Salem: Witch Hunting in the Connecticut River Valley, 1647-1663

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McFarland #ad - Although the hysteria was eventually quelled by a progressive magistrate unwilling to try witches, accounts of the trials later influenced contemporary writers during the Salem witch hunts. Decades before the salem Witch trials, 11 people were hanged as witches in the Connecticut River Valley. This history examines the outbreak of witch hysteria in the Valley, focusing on accusations of demonic possession, apotropaic magic and the role of the clergy.

The advent of witch hunting in new england was directly influenced by the English Civil War and the witch trials in England led by Matthew Hopkins, who pioneered "techniques" for examining witches. The source of the document "Grounds for Examination of a Witch" is identified.

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Records of the Salem Witch-Hunt

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Cambridge University Press #ad - This book represents a comprehensive record of all legal documents pertaining to the Salem witch trials, in chronological order. Numerous manuscripts, as well as records published in earlier books that were overlooked in other editions, offer a comprehensive narrative account of the events of 1692–3, with supplementary materials stretching as far as the mid-18th century.

Manuscripts are accompanied by notes that, in many cases, identify the person who wrote the record. All legal records are newly transcribed, a legal introduction, and included in this edition is a historical introduction, and a linguistic introduction. The book can be used as a reference book or read as an unfolding narrative.

Records of the Salem Witch-Hunt #ad - . This has never been attempted, and much is revealed by seeing who wrote what, when.

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